UPCOMING SALES

Our sale this weekend, the estate of the late
George Lewis and Nancy “Nan” Lewis, will be in

NW OKC’s historic Linwood Place neighborhood.
(See first sale listed below.)

There are ten other sales by friends listed here. 
Just scroll down for full details.

SALE #1 (Sale by McNeil Liquidations):
3201 NW 20th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73107
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
(Numbers for orderly admission handed out from 8:00 a.m. Saturday.)
Sunday, 15 November, from noon until 3:00 p.m.
50% OFF EVERYTHING ON SUNDAY!

Police officer on site throughout sale.
Cash or credit only — checks not accepted.

Home equipped with a satellite-monitored security system.
Sterling, jewelry, and other select items not on site until Saturday.
Realtor Graham Ramsay of Keller Williams/The McCaleb Team
has the listing on this 1928 Linwood Place home.

(No showings prior to sale — sorry.)
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS NW OKC ESTATE SALE.

SALE #2 (Sale by Edmond Antiques):
1213 Copper Rock Drive, Edmond, OK 73025
Friday, 13 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
(Sign-up sheet out at 8:00 a.m.)
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Sunday, 15 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS EDMOND ESTATE SALE.

SALE #3 (Sale by Lavern & Marsha Houck):
10317 Chianti Circle, The Village, OK 73120
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Sunday, 15 November, from noon until 3:00 p.m.
Berkshire Hathaway realtor Alice Fitzpatrick has the listing

on this two year-old home in The Village.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS VILLAGE ESTATE SALE.

SALE #4 (Sale by Whole Home Estate Sales):
1504 SW 137th Terrace, Oklahoma City, OK 73170
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
(Sign-up sheet out at 8:00 a.m.)
Sunday, 15 November, from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
(Sign-up sheet out at 10:00 a.m.)
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS SW OKC ESTATE SALE.

SALE #5 (Sale by J.D. Harris):
8329 NW 112th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73162
Friday, 13 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS NW OKC ESTATE SALE.

SALE #6 (Sale by our friends in the Horner family):
3012 Kerry Lane, The Village, OK 73120
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Sunday, 15 November, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Sterling and other select items not on site until Saturday.
Home equipped with a monitored security system.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS VILLAGE ESTATE SALE.

SALE #7 (Sale by our friends in the Rolston family):
3033 Quail Crossing Way, Edmond, OK 73034
Saturday, 14 November, from 8:30 a.m. to noon,
then closed from noon until 12:30 p.m.
Re-opened again at 12:30 p.m. with reductions.
Sale closes at 4:00 p.m.
Realtor Keith May of Keller Williams has the listing
on this spacious Edmond home.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS EDMOND ESTATE SALE.

SALE #8 (Sale by Georgia Carson):
2709 S. Air Depot Boulevard, Edmond, OK 73013
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Sunday, 15 November, from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS EDMOND ESTATE SALE.

SALE #9 (Sale by Collectibles Etc.):
1511 N. Meridian Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73107
Saturday, 14 November, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.
CLICK HERE TO SEE PICS OF THIS FALL FESTIVAL SALE.

SALE #10 (Auction by Ken Carpenter Auction):
5336 N. Banner Road, El Reno, OK 73036
Saturday, 14 November, from 9:30 a.m.

SALE #11 (Auction by NW Auction):
4808 NW 73rd Street, Oklahoma City, OK
Auction begins at noon on Sunday, 15 November
CLICK HERE TO SEE DETAILS

Our Featured Local Business of the Week this week?
Susie’s Catering!

Comments

    • Dear Janet:

      For us, it’s been thirty-nine years’ worth of experience in the antiques trade; two degrees in American history; full ISA accreditation and certification; USPAP compliance for both state and federal appraisal work; re-certification through ISA every five years; testifying in court as needed for appraisal work; years and years of study, hundreds of thousands of dollars spent on books, seminars, classes, databases, and much more; decades spent spending money on merchandise and learning the hard way; marketing; working like dogs day and night in heat, cold, rat turds, cobwebs, roofing nails, dead mice, human feces (yes, I said that), otherwise indescribable filth, decaying masonry, and rotting woodwork.

      Nothing says “fun,” Janet, quite like being stung by scorpions, squealed at by Norway rats the size of small kittens, being bitten by brown recluse spiders, having black snakes jump out at you out of boxes filled with family papers the client was too lazy to shred, or having piles of stuff fall down on you while you’re cleaning a hoarder’s house.

      And sinus infections? Get ready for them, too, as you’ll be breathing in mountains of dust every day AND exposing yourself to Hantavirus, hepatitis, tuberculosis, and a host of other air-borne afflictions when you start working under some of the execrable conditions often encountered in even the “very best” estates.

      Just yesterday, I had to endure the smell of two poor dead cats who had crawled into the guest house at our sale in the historic Cleveland neighborhood, Janet. (That’s the one that’s slated for the weekend before Thanksgiving.)

      Both cats had died horrible deaths from slow starvation (they’d crawled into the building two months ago when the doors were left open for a short period of time, we think.) Well, guess who had to get the gloves, the scoop shovel, and the Vicks Vapo-Rub? (I had to wear that last one under my nose to keep from retching.)

      Yup — it was Yours Truly out there scraping up dead cat goo and maggots and rotted flesh into Hefty bags so the guest house could be at least somewhat deodorized and ready for realtor showings during and after the estate sale itself. (Yeah. Real glamorous stuff, Janet.)

      Now mix all that aforementioned stuff with manual labor worthy of a pack mule — lifting, toting, hauling, delivering, and dealing with insanely heavy furniture in the very worst of working conditions.

      Ninety percent of what we do is hot, dirty, manual labor most folks don’t even know exists outside chopping cotton, baling hay, and digging post holes.

      In other words, get ready for sore backs, aching feet, cuts, scrapes, and plenty of callouses, corns, and blisters.

      Expect customers to ask you and your crew to lift on sale day even when you clearly and repeatedly advertise that this is NOT something they should ever expect.

      Toss in stress from a million phone calls each week, many of them from folks wanting absolutely free information you’ve worked years to obtain.

      Anticipate phone calls from people who confuse an estate liquidation firm with a consignment shop; deal with phone calls at midnight at least four times a week; factor in the occasional difficult client who pulls merchandise after a contract’s been signed, thus trying to rob you of your hard earned commission.

      Look forward with thinly veneered glee to customers who feel they somehow have the right to trespass on a given property prior to sale day.

      Expect theft and potential theft from dishonest folks who prey on antiques dealers, estate liquidators and auctioneers.

      Get ready for constant pressure from the public and petty arguments among grown adults on sale day.

      Rest assured that you’ll see crappy parking skills from the public that will have the neighbors screaming at the poor estate liquidator who’s done nothing wrong.

      Gird up your loins to get up at 5:00 a.m. every morning and retire at midnight every night.

      I almost forgot to mention extremely high quarterly taxes and huge business expenses (advertising, bonding every four years, liability insurance, E&O insurance, FICA/Social Security self-employment taxes, etc.) for good measure.

      (No one expects the Spanish Inquisition, Janet, but that’s almost part of the whole megillah. Expect massive expenses and sometimes mediocre profits to round out any fiscal year.)

      Ah, then there’s writing off bad checks if you take checks at all — we got hit with over $3,800.00 in losses in fiscal 2014 due to bad checks and stop payments.

      You have to factor in credit card fraud as well. (That’s serious stuff nowadays, and the vendor/liquidator’s now responsible when a non-chip card is used.)

      I should mention paying sales taxes each month — Oklahoma requires prompt payment of sales tax funds held in escrow, and the onus is upon the liquidator to keep all records for up to seven fiscal years. (This includes all sales tax exemption numbers. Don’t forget that.)

      Best of luck dealing with customers who try to “borrow” others’ tax exemption permits and who neglect to bring you a copy of their own current and valid tax exemption permits time after time, even after years of our imploring them to do so.

      Vacation time? Forget it — I’ve not had a vacation in twenty-one years’ time. (I get five days at my Arkansas cabin this Thanksgiving, and that time off will, quite literally, be the first real vacation I’ve had with my family in twenty-one years’ time.

      I can’t neglect to mention colleagues who don’t meet deadlines, or who inadvertently give you inaccurate information even when you advertise for them fee gratis.

      Well, Janet, there you have a perfect cocktail recipe for what it is that makes me who I am and what I do 365 days a year.

      It’s always fun and games when you come through a pretty sale and the gold and diamonds glitter in the showcase while the uniformed police officer stands in a starched uniform at the door and looks official, isn’t it, Janet?

      It’s never fun, though, when one really has to see and experience what it actually took to get that same sale from point A (utter chaos) to point B (a neatly organized affair worthy of admiration).

      Sadly, my profession is largely unregulated, Janet, thus leaving the door open for hobbyists who only take small, easy contracts, criminals and folks with patently false credentials and fake backgrounds, and general hacks who (mysteriously) think this work will be somehow perversely “fun” until they really see what the actual work itself entails. (Do I like this? No. Not one bit. But is it cold, harsh reality? Dang skippy it is.)

      Please feel free to contact me at Oklappraiser@aol.com with any further questions you may have about this, uh, “fascinating” profession.

      (Sorry — I’m in a foul mood this morning, and you caught me at my most curmudgeonly and, well, downright pragmatic. I just don’t feel like sugar-coating things this morning.)

      Best regards,
      Matt McNeil, ISA CAPP
      https://okcestatesales.com

    • Glad to meet you, Mary Ellen! 🙂

      We loved Anita, and were happy to have the opportunity to refer her sale to Mike Davis and Greg Rowland of P.E.L.

      Anita was a good friend of mine, and I have many happy memories of visiting her (and smoking many cigarettes with her!) at her shop up on Western.

      Matt McNeil, ISA CAPP
      http://www.EdmondEstateSales.com

  1. Ok Matt, don’t sugar coat all the great things that it takes to be an estate liquidator, after all if a personal garage sale was so easy we would all be doing them every weekend. You are commended and respected in my book as one of the best at what you do. Thanks for all the years and professionalism you haven given to the trade. You must have enjoyed something about it for all these years since you are still rockin on. Thanks again for all you do.
    Scott Staley
    Seminole

    • Thanks, Scott. I really appreciate your kind words — I really do.

      I’m just tired, and was in a pretty bad mood when I responded this morning.

      I also had forgotten (oops!) that anything I respond to shows up directly on the website.

      Oh, well — c’est la guerre, n’est-ce pas? 🙂

      Fond regards,
      M
      http://www.EdmondEstateSales.com

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